What's So Great About Butternut Squash?

What's So Great About Butternut Squash?

 

A Brief Description

Butternut squash is one of the most common of the winter squashes. It is oblong, has tan – yellow skin and is bright orange in the middle. It is one of the easiest types of squash to prepare for cooking because the skin is easy cut or peel and the seeds are contained to one end. It is moist and soft when cooked but still holds its shape. The taste is described as “sweet, and nutty, similar to a pumpkin”. 

Now on to the fun part!

 

The Health Benefits

Butternut squash is a goldmine of unknown health benefits! It is low in calories (100 grams = 47 calories), and has no saturated fats or cholesterol; however, is full of dietary fiber. 

It is a rich source of vitamin A, vitamin B-6 and potassium. One cup of cubed butternut squash provides 582 mg of potassium which is more than a banana provides. It also provides moderate levels of vitamin C, E and minerals like magnesium and manganese. Butternut squash also contains some iron, zinc, copper, calcium, and phosphorus, as well antioxidants and protein. 

The nutritional contents of squash are beneficial for digestion, blood pressure, for healthy skin and hair, and more. 

Vitamin A is a strong anti-oxidant. It promotes skin health, is an essential element for healthy eye sight and helps prevent infections. 

The fiber found in one cup of cooked squash is around 17% of the daily recommended allowance of fiber for adults. This makes it very good for digestion and preventing constipation.

Butternut squash seeds are nutritious and contain 35-40% oil, and 30% protein. These seeds are a delicious source of dietary fiber and mono-unsaturated fatty acids that benefit heart health. They are also are rich in protein, minerals, and many health-benefiting vitamins.

 

The Many, Many Uses of Butternut Squash

There are hundreds of ways to incorporate butternut squash into your diet. It can be used in a main dish, as a side and even in desserts to add moisture and flavor! It can be roasted, slow cooked, boiled and baked. 

Here are some ideas of how to use it. Any recipes to make these dishes can be found easily on Google along with hundreds more!

 

  • Caramelized butternut squash
  • Slow cooked maple butternut squash
  • Mashed butternut squash
  • Stuffed butternut squash
  • Butternut Squash mac and cheese
  • Butternut Squash lasagna
  • Butternut squash ravioli
  • Butternut squash soup
  • Currie squash soup
  • Beef and butternut squash stew
  • Butternut squash and kale stir-fry
  • Butternut squash hummus
  • Butternut squash corn bread
  • Butternut squash muffins, and cookies
  • Vegetable tart, containing butternut squash
  • And many more!

 

 

Featured Recipe 

A simple and delicious way to bring out the sweetness of the squash is drizzling it with maple syrup and cooking it.

 

  • Prep time: 10 minutes
  • Cook time: 45 minutes
  • Oven Temperature: 400

 

  • Small Butternut squash
  • 2 medium sweet potatoes
  • 4 honey garlic sausages
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • ¼ cup maple syrup

 

Peel and cube the sweet potatoes and butternut squash. 

Slice the honey garlic sausages. 

Add everything to glass pan and drizzle it with the maple syrup and oil.

Mix thoroughly and cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Cook in the oven for 45 minutes or until a fork goes through the sweet potatoes easily.

Let it cool and enjoy!

 

 

 

With insight into the benefits of local veggies, we can see that they provide so much more than we know. There are popular new berries and fruits from other countries that are praised for their magical components but with a closer look we can see that regular and affordable veggies from our own local vicinity offer many of the same healthy benefits and are delicious too! Thank you for reading this and if you would like to try our butternut squash, click the Shop icon at the top of the page and it will take you to our farm store where you can purchase some butternut squash today, along with many other veggies and meats we offer!

 

Tim Livingstone

21.01.2020

Vegetable of the Week